Superfreakonomics

Superfreakonomics

[global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance]

Audiobook CD - 2009
Average Rating:
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Baker & Taylor
In a follow-up to the best-selling Freakonomics, the authors offer a new analysis that is bigger, more provocative, and sure to challenge the way readers think all over again. Simultaneous.

HARPERCOLL

Freakonomics lived on the New York Times bestseller list for an astonishing two years. Now authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner return with more iconoclastic insights and observations in SuperFreakonomics—the long awaited follow-up to their New York Times Notable blockbuster. Based on revolutionary research and original studies SuperFreakonomics promises to once again challenge our view of the way the world really works.



Baker
& Taylor

In a follow-up to "Freakonomics," the authors offer a new analysis of how the economy really works.

Publisher: Westminster, Md. ; New York : Books on Tape, p2009
Edition: Library ed
ISBN: 9780307713865
0307713865
9780060889357
Characteristics: 6 sound discs (7 hr., 28 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in
Additional Contributors: Dubner, Stephen J.

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r
Revacard
Jun 29, 2016

I so enjoyed this book. I wish people were more open to strange/different ideas, and instead of making it political. That is what I like about the Freakanomics series. I like the child-like mentality to look at an issue.

1
1aa
Jun 09, 2016

Entertaining, enlightening, this gives a quirky economic take on a number of issues, primarily by trying to tease out the incentives (and misperceived incentives) among actors that contribute to the problem, much like the first book.

d
danielestes
Jan 04, 2016

The Stevens have done it again.

The follow-up to the immensely popular Freakonomics could have easily been a rushed cash-grab, but the authors took their time crafting an entry worthy of the series and it paid off. SuperFreakonomics is another home run. Some readers might say it's more of the same, but that's not giving credit where it's due. Using their own brand of quirky economic reasoning to produce Freakonomics was a brilliant move, and to apply a similar but ever-evolving process to a new set of contentious societal problems isn't "more of the same." It's about growing a process that works.

As long as complex problems exist in the world, there will always be a place for the Freakonomics approach to solving them.

j
jumpinjimster
Sep 13, 2015

Good book. Microeconomics is something I have never really gotten into before or understood. This book objectively talks about everyday things and how they affect us.

I like it much better than Macroeconomics and the gambling and hype of the stock market.

s
sanitycheck
Dec 06, 2014

I liked the book - really entertaining. I was often laughed. You have to have some intellect, some knowledge of statistics and definitely scene of humor in order to enjoy it. The book definitely makes you to think out of box. If you are too serious about Freakonomics you should probably read “Economics For Dummies”.

s
sky123
May 05, 2013

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/blogs/freakonomics/posts/WashWeb.jpg

Cedars-Sinai's screen saver increased frequency of doctors washing hands.

m
MatteoImparare
Dec 21, 2011

I just finished Super Freakonomics. It is a collection of odd, fairly disconnected, stories. The common theme between all of them is that economic analysis has been used to crack the enigma. The resulting behaviour can be explained using economics.

Even Bill Gates really likes this book <http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Personal/Thoughts-on-SuperFreakonomics>. In the sequel to Freakonomics, Levitt and Dubner discuss applying economics principles to a variety of topics. They talk about apathy, altruism, how accurate the homo-economicus model is, global cooling, finding trends in bank data to detect suspect terrorists, car safety, and several healthcare improvements.

It gives examples of positive and negative externalities, and how negative ones can be internalized. Several programs, like US drug enforcement, are considered in terms of economics -- find out why the recent strategy is certain to fail (it isn't bad execution, but a fundamental flaw with strategy).
I would definitely recommend this to anyone - it is an interesting approach to various worldly topics.

In the sequel to Freakonomics, Levitt and Dubner discuss applying economics principles to a variety of topics. They talk about apathy, altruism, how accurate the homo-economicus model is, global cooling, finding trends in bank data to detect suspect terrorists, car safety, and several healthcare improvements. It gives examples of positive and negative externalities, and how negative ones can be internalized. Several programs, like US drug enforcement, are considered in terms of economics -- find out why the recent strategy is certain to fail (it isn't bad execution, but a fundamental flaw with strategy).

GregWT Nov 23, 2011

Interesting perspective on the economic engine. Not a can't put down suspense thriller but easy listening and entertaining.

d
davidx2718
Apr 12, 2011

Entertaining, interesting, and a lot of fun. The authors know how to mine data for answers and have a great set of stories about how people often choose to make life difficult when analysis shows a simple solution. Hear about the doctor who found a way to prevent deaths in childbirth ... and was despised and ignored. Or public outrage about 38 witnesses who saw a murder and did nothing ... but, who came up with the number 38, and why did the police ignore the first emergency call? Or child car seats: they're cumbersome, difficult to install, and expensive ... but is there any evidence that they work? The ultimate question is how to change human behaviour when a solution is staring us in the face. Are people altruistic by nature, or does a little cold hard cash help to bring out the warm and fuzzies? Levitt and Dubner take the most sensitive topics and throw the bright light of analysis on them, probably ruffling a few feathers in the process.

Mini spoiler: Why should suicide bombers buy life insurance? Because that way they won't stand out in a data search that targets their characteristic banking habits!

d
DalysJ
Mar 07, 2011

Awesome! Even better than Freakonomics!

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