Braiding Sweetgrass

Braiding Sweetgrass

Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants

Book - 2020
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NANCY STAUFFER
Apr 06, 2021

Recommended by Myrriah

a
AAntosz
Mar 20, 2021

Braiding Sweetgrass is one of the most important books I've read in my lifetime.
It not only strengthened my relationship with Mother Nature but also helped recognize the joy each day brings.
I've also recommended this book to many family and friends.

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njkstl
Mar 20, 2021

Audrey recommendation.

a
annveerman
Mar 03, 2021

Some beautiful prose that enhances a mystical understanding of the connectivity of life.

Despite it's great potential I could not finish the book. Some serious editorial discipline is needed.

I suspect the publishing was rushed to jump on the indigenous wisdom bandwagon.

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zvanstanley
Dec 07, 2020

This is one of my all-time favorite reads. The blending of traditional and scientific ways of knowing the world combine to create a beautiful appreciation of the natural world.

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mjschmidt59
Oct 23, 2020

Lovely read. Well written and interweaves different ways of knowing the world in a positive and valuable way.

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EmilyEm
Oct 21, 2020

Essays that lend depth to our understanding of the interconnectedness of all living things and a point of view based on Indigenous history and teachings giving meaning to words like gratitude, reciprocity and home. A Milkweed Editions publication.

Some of Kimmerer’s essays just took my breath away. Having spent time outdoors in both parts of New York and Oregon, settings for much of her work, I could be right in her settings with her. Hope my gardening friends pick this one up; I waited months for a library copy. Interesting that just as it came it got a shout-out from 'Vesper Flights' writer Helen MacDonald when she was interviewed for the recent Minnesota Public Radio/Star Tribune ‘Talking Volumes.’ Perfect reading for this time.

ontherideau Oct 08, 2020

Let's start with respect for the land and gratitude for every morsel we take from it.
"we perpetrate the illusion that the things we consume have just fallen off the back of Santa's sleigh, not been ripped from the earth. The illusion enables us to imagine that the only choices we have are between brands."

debwalker Sep 24, 2020

Resurging as a bestseller for this dark covidtime.

JCLMaggieS Sep 15, 2020

This book reads like home.

c
cindiet
Sep 01, 2020

Rec by Jane Sept 2020

JCLFlanneryC Aug 03, 2020

A book that combines ecology, mythology, and observation to show how we can nurture the planet. Beginning with a challenge to rethink our potential for positive interaction & reciprocity with the Earth, Robin Wall Kimmerer brings in examples from her family, community, and Potawatomi tradition to consider ways in which we might begin to evolve our relationship into something mutual & beautiful. I would describe this book as "radically corny," that is, earnest & Utopic in a way that most of us raised in capitalist consumer societies might find frankly embarrassing (e.g. "A garden is the land's way of saying 'I love you"). However it's also very inspiring: one cannot help but be moved by Kimmerer's vision of a Congress that begins its sessions with a prayer of gratitude to Mother Earth. This is one of the few "feel-good" environmentalist texts that encourages meaningful rituals & relationships with the planet.

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mannalie
Jul 17, 2020

Beautifully written, this is a perspective that more people need to hear. I especially enjoyed listening to the author read the audio book. I learned so much! I'll definitely return to reread this one.

a
afowler813
Apr 01, 2020

Beautifully articulated!

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sloopie72
Dec 30, 2019

PPL dec 2019 staff pick.
https://twitter.com/PortPublicLibME/status/1211678947550867457
need more plant stuff, my phyto tweep

g
guyberliner
Nov 24, 2019

In this book, the author weaves together a beautiful, healing braid to help bind our wounds, and the Earth's.

s
seanhagey
Oct 04, 2018

This is a really important book. Part Native/Indigenous history, part autobiography, part science, part storytelling - almost a collection of essays.

Some of the parts didn't quite fit well together, or at least that's how it seemed to me, but still a great and powerful book. I would highly recommend it to others, it has the power to change how you look at and interact with the world and the people in it.

squib Aug 21, 2018

Robin Wall Kimmerer has offered us all so much knowledge through her weaving together of history, memoir, and myth like three strands of sweetgrass. It is a call for us--All of Us--to dedicate ourselves to cleaning up the aftermath of industrial colonialism.

Love the land, the plants, fungi, animals, they are our cousins and we're all in this together. So, let's, shall we?

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ncs1961
May 12, 2018

An interesting and informative book - part autobiography, part indigenous social history threaded together with some plant science. I enjoyed listening to the author share her story & ideas in bits while walking or drifting off to sleep.

DBRL_ReginaF Apr 26, 2018

I read this book for the Read Harder 2018 Challenge (Task #18 - a book about nature) and i LOVED it! I loved the blend of science and indigenous philosophy. Every line seemed to be a quotable line, but here is one of my favorites - “The land knows you, even when you are lost.”

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singingshauna
Jan 30, 2018

It seems of late that I have read many, many books written by indigenous peoples that are heartbreaking. Their stories need to be heard in our world at this time. But Braiding Sweetgrass is a story, although nonfiction, that touches my soul in a completely different way. I came away from reading this book hopeful for the future. I came away from reading this book being more generous, and grateful for the gifts the land gives us. I am reminded to be thankful for all the bounties nature gives us.

P347...’If the bird’s gift is song, then it has a responsibility to greet the day with music. It is the duty of birds to sing and the rest of us receive this song as a gift.… We may not have wings or leaves, but we humans do have words. Language is our gift and our responsibility.’

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Mooseum
Nov 25, 2017

This quickly became one of my favorite books. Robin Wall Kimmerer is a scientist who writes with a sensitivity and understanding of nature from an indigenous perspective and that makes all the difference. We do not have enough respect for the land and if we understood the native stories, maybe we would have a newfound appreciation for the earth. There is poetry and music in her writing as well as respect and gratitude.

p
peacebenow
Oct 06, 2017

I am now in the process of trying to internalize the word reciprocity. Reading this book was like taking a spiritual journey on the natural wonders and care of the earth under the guidance of science. I hope her teachings will remain with me. Thank you!

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LexiLou2
Aug 09, 2016

I went into a different state when reading this novel. It was enthralling. Robin is a fantastic storyteller who captivated me with her descriptions that were never verbose, but always detailed. There were so many gems of Indigenous Knowledge in this book. It is beautiful.

c
c_anderson
Jun 15, 2016

This is an amazing book - beautifully written, wise, and informative.


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